Arquivos da categoria: imagem

ICC 2017 – International Cartographic Conference

workshop maps & emotions

No começo de julho de 2017, fiz duas apresentações no ICC 2017 – 28th International Cartographic Conference em Washington D.C. Ambas fazem parte da minha pesquisa de doutorado. A primeira apresentação foi no workshop Maps & Emotions organizado pelos professores Sébastien Caquard, Amy Griffin e Alex Kent. A segunda apresentação foi em uma das mesas sobre cartografia crítica do evento principal. Em breve, os artigos completos estarão disponíveis para download.


 

Cartographic narratives and deep mapping: a conceptual proposal

Abstract: 

In this study, there will be discussed a trend called deep mapping, an interdisciplinary topic in the spatial humanities field that aims to explore narrative capabilities of maps, revealing stories associated with places. According to this approach, maps can be used as a tool to encourage a deeper knowledge about places. Besides that, maps can be extremely helpful to discover underlying meanings in the complexity of the space, showing patterns that otherwise would not be apparent. Essentially, the major challenge of deep mapping is to deal with qualitative aspects of places, like emotions and memories. Thus, the main question raised by this investigation is: how deep maps could be able to represent memories, emotions and perceptions associated with spatial experiences of urban places? Considering that scenario, this study is motivated to suggest a conceptual framework that could contribute with the future discussions about deep mapping. We argue that, in order to accomplish this challenge, deep maps should embrace three fundamental principles: (1) the walking, (2) the archaeology and (3) the montage. The walking presupposes that maps must encourage people to discover places by strolling, tracing alternative paths on the urban maze. The archaeological feature of deep maps corresponds to the assumption that cartographic narratives should provide a historical depth, looking for cultural objects that rest under the remains of that place’s history. The montage in deep maps corresponds to the idea that depth could be achieved through the combination of several media, such as photos, videos, texts, audios, hypertext, or even other maps. Therefore, we believe that these three principles – which are based on Walter Benjamin’s critical thought about Modernity – form a conceptual structure that could inspire future methodological approaches regarding deep mapping.


 

Art and Cartography as a Critique of Borders

Abstract: 

This study focuses on the convergence of art and cartography, whose approach provides relevant discussions about the critique of scientific maps. In the context of the Critical Cartography, Jeremy Crampton says that a critique is an investigation of the assumptions of a field of knowledge, not a disapproving judgment. In his own words, “critique is a political practice of questioning and resisting what we know in order to open up ways of knowing”. In that sense, contemporary art plays an important role not only to discuss the relationship between power and knowledge in cartography, but also to propose other categories of thought. Embracing aesthetic purposes, artists use maps as an expression against the false neutrality of the formal cartography, which considers a map as precise tool to represent space based on strict conventions. J. B. Harley says that a map will always be a partial representation and cannot be exempt from its ideological inclination. Thus, the explicit manipulation of the cartographic language in the context of visual arts can uncover other qualities of the space, making clear the partiality of the maps. Therefore, we emphasize the potential of artworks to communicate different insights about how we experience and live the contemporary space.

Among several map properties, there is a crucial visual element: the representation of borders, understood here in a broad sense as an arbitrary delimitation of a certain space. In general, borders are based on political decisions, often involving tensions and power dispute. Therefore, scientific maps have to clearly communicate these borders according to strict rules. However, people’s perception of the real space could not exactly correspond to this rigid definition. This scenario leads to the following question: how the intersection between art and cartography can improve the critical thinking about borders? By questioning borders, we suggest that art is able to show that real spaces are characterized by liminal spaces or thresholds, not by absolute or strict separations. Contrasting with borders, the notion of threshold not only indicates the separation of two ambiences, but also includes aspects of transitions, gradual change, movement. Therefore, this concept connects space and time, allowing a transition between two points, experiencing limits, testing forces, leaving the comfort zone, risking new approaches.

From this perspective, we highlight some artworks: first, we selected an image of the installation called Area Restringida (Restricted Area), an artwork created by Mateo Maté. Using barrier poles, Maté created a restricted area in a shape of the whole American continent, which is also under surveillance of a camera and security agents. Visitors are blocked by these “borders”, preventing them to trespass the installation. Second, we’ve chosen an artwork called Upotia, created by Nicolas Desplats. The artist created several paint buckets, labeling them as upotia: the ink supposedly could be used to set the frontiers of an imaginary land. Referring the famous concept of Utopia, Desplats brings some interesting discussions about the “cartographer’s perfect dream” of tracing an ideal frontier. Finally, we highlight the work of Francis Alÿs, an artist that proposed performances in two of the most controversial borders worldwide: the US-Mexico border and the Green Line in Israel.

These examples deal with the strictness of the borders, demonstrating how an aesthetic approach can be used as a mode of interpretation of cultural aspects regarding space in contemporary society. By recovering Critical Cartography investigations to support discussions about borders in arts, this study also raise questions about the arbitrary delimitation of spaces that are otherwise composed by diversity, power relations and conflict.

A arqueologia benjaminiana para iluminar o presente midiático

Captura de Tela 2017-06-07 às 21.08.29

Artigo que escrevi junto com a profa. Lucia Santaella sobre a arqueologia em Walter Benjamin. O artigo foi publicado no livro da Compós, edição de 2017.

Aprendi muito ao escrever esse artigo. Sinto-me cada vez mais envolvido com a filosofia de Walter Benjamin. Espero que gostem!

Resumo:

Entende-se a arqueologia como a ciência das ruínas que recupera fragmentos soterrados em busca de novas interpretações da história. A investigação arqueológica pode nos conduzir a uma reconstrução do nosso próprio presente, uma vez que estabelece novas conexões com o passado. Segundo Benjamin, essas conexões surgem como um “lampejo” a partir de uma tensão dialética de caráter temporal. A esse “lampejo”, Benjamin deu o nome de “imagem dialética”. Assim, defendemos a hipótese de que as imagens podem ser instrumentos heurísticos de representação da realidade, evidenciando propriedades anacrônicas da cultura. Dessa maneira, reforçamos que a postura crítica de Benjamin em relação à história gera profundas implicações para os estudos da comunicação.

SANTAELLA, Lucia. RIBEIRO, Daniel Melo. A arqueologia benjaminiana para iluminar o presente midiático. In: MUSSE, Christina Ferraz; SILVA, Herom Vargas; NICOLAU, Marcos Antonio. Comunicação, mídias e temporalidades. Edufba; Brasília, Compós, 2017. ISBN 978-85-232-1592-7.

As ruínas de Anhalter Bahnhof

Berlin Anhalter Bahnhof

If the ‘arcade’ counts as the best material witness to nineteenth-century Paris, as Benjamin famously argued in his massive historiographic fragment, The Arcades Project, surely the railway – perhaps Berlin’s Anhalter train station – would have to count as the best material witness to German/Jewish modernity. It was, after all, the railway that literally unified Germany in the late nineteenth century and connected Berlin to Western and Eastern Europe in the twentieth – in splendor, emancipation, and horror(…)

Both the railway and the arcade thus became the symbols and proof of their epochs: railways represented progress because they were the technological realization of mobility, speed, and exchange. They also became the first mode of transportation to move the masses, from the formation of mass politics to the implementation of mass deportations. And, finally, both the arcades and the railways eventually fell out of favor, overtaken by some other formation imagined to be faster, more fashionable, more progressive, more opulent, and more destructive. The heady heydays of the arcades and the railway may be over, but their constitutive dreams are still legible in the surviving remains. The physical ruins of the Anhalter Bahnhof and its varied cultural testimonies may be all we are left with, but it is from these remains that we can map the cultural geographies of German/Jewish modernity. The Anhalter Bahnhof represents a paradigm of modernity, one that is already grafted, as a dialectical image, onto these cultural geographies.

PRESNER, Todd. Mobile Modernity: Germans, Jews, Trains. New York: Columbia University Press. 2007. p. 2-3

Imaginação

IMG_20161105_094126676

“A ligação estabelecida por Walter Benjamin entre a ‘iluminação profana’ e a técnica fotográfica nos mostra que a inundação de embriaguez não seria nada – nada que valha, nada que dure, nada que tenha valor crítico – sem a construção de suas imagens no tempo. Construção da duração que não existiria sem alguma mediação técnica. O que a embriaguez faz surgir como iluminação ou ‘instante utópico’ da imagem cabe à imaginação – desde então vislumbrada como duração utópica da imagem – fazendo dela uma experiência para o pensamento, uma imagem de pensamento. Pois ela é um jogo, pois ela não cessa de desmontar todas as coisas, a imaginação é construção imprevisível e infinita, retomada perpétua dos movimentos comprometidos, contraditórios, surpreendidos pelas novas bifurcações. Essa construção se dá bem, dialeticamente, sobre dois enquadramentos: ela dispõe as coisas para melhor expor as relações. Ela cria relações com as diferenças, ela lança pontes por cima dos abismos que ela mesma abre. Ela é, portanto, montagem, atividade onde a imaginação se torna uma técnica – um artesanato, uma atividade manual e de aparelhos – que produz pensamento em um ritmo incessante de diferenças e relações.”

DIDI-HUBERMAN, Georges. Quand les images prennent position. L’oeil de l’histoire, 1. Paris: Les éditions de minuit, 2009. p. 238-239.

O flâneur observa

A une passante – Charles Baudelaire

La rue assourdissante autour de moi hurlait.
Longue, mince, en grand deuil, douleur majestueuse,
Une femme passa, d’une main fastueuse
Soulevant, balançant le feston et l’ourlet ;

Agile et noble, avec sa jambe de statue.
Moi, je buvais, crispé comme un extravagant,
Dans son oeil, ciel livide où germe l’ouragan,
La douceur qui fascine et le plaisir qui tue.

Un éclair… puis la nuit ! – Fugitive beauté
Dont le regard m’a fait soudainement renaître,
Ne te verrai-je plus que dans l’éternité ?

Ailleurs, bien loin d’ici ! trop tard ! jamais peut-être !
Car j’ignore où tu fuis, tu ne sais où je vais,
Ô toi que j’eusse aimée, ô toi qui le savais !

História de fantasmas

Walter Benjamin

Aby Warburg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Ainda que Benjamin, errante e pobre, tenha pressentido a distância social que o separava do erudito idoso e afortunado [Warburg], ele se reconheceu no pesquisador judeu, isolado, sem cátedra – tendo sido negada a ambos a habilitação universitária -, perfeitamente anacrônico em seu interesse não positivista pelos ‘restos da história’, em sua busca não evolucionista dos ‘tempos perdidos’ que estremecem a memória humana em sua longa duração cultural. (…) Mas, para além do prestígio ético, para além da figura do pensador erudito, é no terreno dessa problemática que Benjamin pôde se sentir próximo de Warburg (ele teria se sentido ainda mais próximo, é certo se tivesse tido acesso à intimidade da pesquisa warburguiana, ao estilo exploratório dos inéditos, a suas fórmulas de pensamento, ao seu humor e também ao seu desespero). Como Warburg, Benjamin colocou a imagem no centro nevrálgico da ‘vida histórica’. Como ele, compreendeu que esse ponto de vista exigia a elaboração de novos modelos de tempo: a imagem não está na história como um ponto sobre uma linha. Ela não é nem um simples evento no devir histórico, nem um bloco de eternidade insensível às condições desse devir. Ela possui – ou melhor, produz – uma temporalidade com dupla face: o que Warburg havia apreendido em termos de ‘polaridade’ observáveis em todas as etapas da análise, Benjamin, por sua vez, acabaria por apreendê-lo em termos de ‘dialética’ e de ‘imagem dialética’.”

DIDI-HUBERMAN, Georges. Diante do tempo: história da arte e anacronismo das imagens. Belo Horizonte: Editora UFMG, 2015. p. 106.

Imagem dialética, imagem sobrevivente

Rue Jeanne d'Arc, 13ème arrondissement, Paris

Rue Jeanne d’Arc, 13ème arrondissement, Paris

“A imagem dialética à qual nos convida Benjamin consiste, antes, em fazer surgirem os momentos inestimáveis que sobrevivem, que resistem a tal organização de valores, fazendo-a explodir em momentos de surpresa. Busquemos, então, as experiências que se transmitem ainda para além de todos os espetáculos comprados e vendidos a nossa volta (…) Somos ‘pobres em experiência’? Façamos dessa mesma pobreza – dessa semiescuridão – uma experiência.(…) O valor da experiência caiu de cotação, mas cabe somente a nós, em cada situação particular, erguer essa queda à dignidade, à nova beleza de uma coreografia, de uma invenção de formas. Não assume a imagem, em sua própria fragilidade, em sua intermitência de vaga-lume, a mesma potência, cada vez que ela nos mostra sua capacidade de reaparecer, de sobreviver?”

DIDI-HUBERMAN, Georges. Sobrevivência dos vaga-lumes. Belo Horizonte: Editora UFMG, 2011. P. 127